Dating violence hotline

“For example, demanding to know where someone is at all times, touching or pinching parts of someone's body in public when they’ve made it clear it’s unwanted, or controlling what type of clothes someone wears—these are all abusive behaviors that violate someone’s boundaries.” The laws about sexual violence and dating violence vary by state and situation.

The following information is not a legal guide or an exhaustive list—rather it’s a general list of early warning signs for behaviors that are, or could become, violent.

Victims of teen dating violence often keep the abuse a secret.

They should be encouraged to reach out to trusted adults like parents, teachers, school counselors, youth advisors, or health care providers.

A national survey found that ten percent of teens, female and male, had been the victims of physical dating violence within the past year and can increase the risk of physical injury, poor academic performance, binge drinking, suicide attempts, unhealthy sexual behaviors, substance abuse, negative body image and self-esteem, and violence in future relationships.

Teen dating violence can be prevented, especially when there is a focus on reducing risk factors as well as fostering protective factors, and when teens are empowered through family, friends, and others (including role models such as teachers, coaches, mentors, and youth group leaders) to lead healthy lives and establish healthy relationships.

The site includes an overview of the issue (e.g., early warning signs, types of abuse, the cycle of abuse), quizzes for teens to determine whether they are experiencing or inflicting abuse, a live chat feature that connects youth with a peer advocate 24/7, videos, a blog, and more.

With dating violence, early warning signs often begin with behaviors that are not physically violent.

They can also seek confidential counsel and advice from professionally trained adults and peers.

Resources for teens involved in abusive relationships include the following: The National Domestic Violence Hotline 1.800.799.

Break the Cycle A national, nonprofit organization (supported by many philanthropic organizations, government entities and senators, and members of the entertainment industry) which addresses teen dating violence, Break the Cycle’s mission is to engage, educate, and empower youth to build lives and communities free from domestic violence.

Break the Cycle provides resources and information for teens, educators, parents, supporters, and the media.

Leave a Reply